Vegetation Management-Keeping Rights of Way Free of Natural Intrusion Offers Many Benefits

Keeping power transmission rights of way (ROW) safe and clear is an important utility company responsibility. As one of this month's articles, "Always Clear–The Path for Power Must be Kept Free of Natural Intrusion," by Paul Hull points out, many people think of ROW clearance as acres of vegetation that must be maintained somewhere outside the city.

2011 04 Up John Tabor

"Always Clear–The Path for Power Must be Kept Free of Natural Intrusion," by Paul Hull points out, many people think of ROW clearance as acres of vegetation that must be maintained somewhere outside the city. The fact is, there are many dangers from vegetation to power lines in the city–on busy streets, in yards, along alleys and near buildings. Many times people plant trees and shrubs too close to power lines without realizing how tall they will grow. Fortunately, there is equipment to remove intrusive branches from the tops of trees–regardless of the height. Hull discusses various tree trimming companies, when to hire outside help, and mulching and its benefits.

Another great article, "Integrated Vegetation Management Programs Spark New Ideas, Deliver Broad Benefits," outlines how, in response to stricter clearance guidelines from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), utilities are discovering the benefits of integrated vegetation management (IVM) programs. And, rather than viewing FERC as a threat, many utilities see this as an opportunity to invest in IVM programs to protect power transmission and enhance natural ROW habitats. The article discusses how to implement environmental change and plan for the future.

This month's Utility Products also brings you an informative mobile workforce article, "Critical Communications Software Meets the Needs of Tomorrow's Mobile Workforce," by James Mustarde. Utilities are providing the same quality or better service with fewer resources, it's reported, and the role of the field worker must evolve to include new responsibilities. Among those responsibilities is communication to directly manage utilities' projects, service calls, disaster response and operations-management tasks. Mustarde discusses how to leverage communications software to meet this expectation and overcome challenges–helping equip field technicians to engage in clear and immediate two-way communications.

2011 04 Up John TaborRegards,
John Tabor
Associate Editor
johnt@pennwell.com

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