DOE updates power outage progress for East Coast

There are 4,657,013 customers without power in the affected states, according to the DOE

Washington, D.C., November 1, 2012 — The following information on electric restoration information was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, and is accurate as of November 1.

As of 9:00 a.m. EDT November 1 there are 4,657,013 customers without power in the affected states, according to the DOE. This is down from 6,249,397 customers without power 24 hours ago.

As of 7:00 a.m. EDT, November 1, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reports three nuclear power units in the Northeastern United States continue to be shut down and two units remain reduced as a result of impacts from Hurricane Sandy.

Connecticut

The United Illuminating Co. reported October 31 is continuing restoration work and damage assessments of its electrical infrastructure.

Connecticut Light and Power (CL&P) reported October 31 that it has 5,000 workers responding to damage from Hurricane Sandy. Groups of employees are working to complete damage assessments and line workers are responding to emergencies, restoring power to town-identified critical customers, such as water treatment plants, police and fire stations and shelter locations.

Delaware

Delmarva Power reported the afternoon of October 31 that they have mobilized more than 1,500 service personnel including company teams and crews from as far away as New Mexico. In Northern Delaware and in Northeast Maryland, 90 percent of customers were expected to be restored by midnight October 31. On the Southern Delmarva Peninsula, most customers are expected to receive service by November 2 at 6 p.m.

Maine

Central Maine Power Co. (CMP) announced October 31 that they company expected to have power restored to all customers by late October 31.

Maryland

FirstEnergy Corp., whose utilities serve New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland and West Virginia, reported October 31 that its Maryland customers will be restored by early evening November 3, with the exception of the hardest hit area of Garrett County, which requires further assessment. Its assessment and restoration effort in the wake of Hurricane Sandy includes more the 12,000 company personnel, electrical contractors and outside utility resources are assisting with service restoration efforts.

Pepco, serving Washington, D.C. and Maryland, stated that they expected to have all of their customers restored by late October 31.

Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. (BGE) stated Wednesday they expect the vast majority of customers to have power restored by November 2 night, with some scattered customer outages involving smaller numbers of customers and/or significant system damage extending into the weekend More than 5,000 out-of-state and contract linemen, tree personnel and support staff make up BGE's restoration workforce.

Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative (SMECO) restored all outages October 31.

Massachusetts

NSTAR reported the afternoon of October 31 that it expects to restore power to all of its customers by tonight.

National Grid reported October 31 that it expects to restore the majority of its customers in Massachusetts by November 1 and have restoration fully completed by November 2

Michigan

Detroit Edison reported the afternoon of October 31 that they expect to have 90 percent of customers restored by midnight November 1, but it will take several days before every customer affected by the storm is back in service.

5,000 workers responding to damage from Hurricane Sandy. Groups of employees are working to complete damage assessments and line workers are responding to emergencies, restoring power to town-identified critical customers, such as water treatment plants, police and fire stations and shelter locations.

New Hampshire

Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH) reported October 31 that the first wave of 75 two-man crews from Hydro Québec arrived in New Hampshire that afternoon and joined with PSNH crews and contractors already in the field. Aided by others, including crews from as far away as Texas and Oklahoma, PSNH expects that its restoration will be substantially completed by the evening of November 2

New Hampshire Electric Coop (NHEC) announced October 31, that they expect all customers to be restored by mid-day November 2.

New Jersey

Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), serving New Jersey reported this morning that it forecasts to have virtually all of its customers restored to service within the next seven to ten days. But customers who have individual flooding or downed lines issues may take longer to be restored. PSE&G has assembled over 1,730 technicians — 600 PSE&G workers, 1,050 workers from across the country, and an additional 600 contractors to cut and remove trees.

Crews helping in the restoration efforts have arrived from Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin, as well as Canada.

Orange and Rockland (O&R), serving New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania estimated at 8:00 a.m. October 31 that a majority of its customers without power should have electricity restored within 10 days, but complete repairs and total service restoration could take weeks.

The company has restored 13 of the 27 transmission lines and 7 of the substations that were damaged by the storm. More than 1,000 O&R employees and over 1,000 contractors from almost 20 states are working on rebuilding O&R's electric system.

Jersey Central Power and Light, reported October 31 that the majority of its customers will be restored in the next seven days and customers in the hardest-hit areas are expected to be restored within 14 days. Remaining customers will be restored once damaged roads, infrastructure and homes are rebuilt.

Across the FirstEnergy utilities, more the 12,000 company personnel, electrical contractors and outside utility resources are assisting with service restoration efforts. These workers including linemen, dispatchers, hazard responders, damage assessors, mechanics, supervisors, and call center representatives.

Atlantic City Electric (AEC) reports extensive damage to its system. As of noon October 31, AEC estimates 90 percent of customers in the Mainland areas (Cape May, Glassboro, Pleasantville, and Winslow Districts) will be restored by midnight on November 4. Restoration estimates for the NJ Barrier Islands will be established after damage assessments have been completed.

New York

Consolidated Edison (ConEd) announced October 31 that it restored power to customers served by two underground electrical networks taken out of service October 29. The networks are in lower Manhattan (serving 2,000 customers) and Brighton Beach (serving 28,200 customers). The company stated that underground lines are expected to be back within three days and overhead lines will take at least a week.

ConEd stated that across its service area the storm knocked down more than 100,000 primary electrical wires in overhead areas.

Central Hudson estimated October 31 that it is on track to meet its projected restoration goal of 90 percent of total impacted customers by November 2 at 11:00 p.m. Some restoration activities will continue to take place over the weekend. Central Hudson is deploying 700 employee line personnel, contractors, and mutual aid crews from Florida, Iowa, Indiana and Wisconsin.

New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG) reported October 31 that is expects to restore power to the vast majority of its customers in Rochester by midnight November 2. The company continues to conduct its damage assessment and estimated restoration times for other regions will be established when the damage assessment is complete.

Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) has more than 1,200 crews from National Grid, other utilities and qualified contractors from as far as California and Texas are currently assisting with restoration efforts, supported by more than 4,500 people behind the scenes from virtually every company department assisting with activities such as call handling, logistics and damage assessment.

An additional 1,969 utility personnel are on way to Long Island to assist in the restoration effort October 31 restored power to 22 substations of 50 that were out of power. LIPA anticipates some customers to be without power at least 7 to 10 days.

Orange and Rockland (O&R), serving New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania estimated at 8:00 a.m. October 31 that a majority of its customers without power should have electricity restored within 10 days, but complete repairs and total service restoration could take weeks. The company has restored 13 of the 27 transmission lines and 7 of the substations that were damaged by the storm. More than 1,000 O&R employees and over 1,000 contractors from almost 20 states are working on rebuilding O&R's electric system.

Ohio

Ohio Edison, a FirstEnergy Co., announced October 31 that the majority of customers in Erie, Ottawa, Huron and Medina counties are expected to have service restored by midnight November 1, while the majority of customers in Lorain County are expected to be restored by noon November 2. Ohio Edison customers in all other areas were anticipated to be restored by midnight October 31.

Pennsylvania

PECO has gathered has a team of 3,500 PECO crews, contractors and employees from other utilities working to restored service to its customers. PECO expects to be able to restore service to about 80-90 percent of customers impacted by the storm by nighttime November 2. Service for most of the remaining customers should be restored during the weekend. Some customers, in the most damaged and isolated areas may be without electric service until next week.

FirstEnergy, which includes PennPower, WestPenn Power, Met-Ed and Penelec, reported October 31 that nearly 95 percent of Met-Ed's customers are expected to be restored by this weekend, with the remainder restored early next week. The majority of affected customers in the Erie, Oil City, Johnstown, Lewistown and Clearfield areas should have been restored around midnight October 31.

The majority of Penelec customers in Altoona, Mansfield and Towanda are expected to be restored by midnight November 1. Across the FirstEnergy utilities, more the 12,000 company personnel, electrical contractors and outside utility resources are assisting with service restoration efforts.

PPL Utilities reports that the hardest-hit areas are in the Lehigh Valley, the Poconos and northeastern Pennsylvania, and Bucks County. The utility expects outages to last through the weekend. PPL received more than 400 line technicians, tree crews, and other personnel from the Kentucky-based utilities Kentucky Utilities Co (KU) and Louisville Gas & Electric (LG&E) which are subsidiaries of PPL's parent company, PPL Corp.

Orange and Rockland (O&R), serving New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania estimated at 8:00 a.m. October 31 that a majority of its customers without power should have electricity restored within 10 days, but complete repairs and total service restoration could take weeks.

The company has restored 13 of the 27 transmission lines and 7 of the substations that were damaged by the storm. More than 1,000 O&R employees and over 1,000 contractors from almost 20 states are working on rebuilding O&R's electric system.

Rhode Island

National Grid reported October 31 that it expects all power to be restored to its customers, except for isolated outages, by November 2. The company stated there might be possible isolated restorations occurring November 3.

Virginia

Dominion Power stated that In Northern Virginia, where the storm's impact was greatest, restoration is expected to be completed the night of November 1 in all but a very few locations where flooding or severe damage occurred.

Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative (NOVEC) announced October 31 that the majority of its customers have been restored. It anticipates having most customers' service restored by nightfall on November 2. NOVEC crews, along with crews from North and South Carolina and Maryland, are making sure all power lines are repaired and connected.

Shenandoah Electric Cooperative (SVEC) reports that, as of 9:30 p.m. October 31, the majority of customers will have power restored by the end of the day; however, scattered outages may remain due to more difficult to address repairs. With the number of members affected, SVEC has brought in additional manpower, including crews from six cooperatives, and two contractors, from Alabama, North Carolina and Virginia. In total, SVEC has about 425 men and women working to restore electric service.

Appalachian Power (AEP), which services Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, released some restoration estimates October 31 for Virginia, noting that Lebanon (Russell) and Tazewell (Tazewell) and all surrounding areas should be 90 percent restored by midnight November 1 and Grundy (Buchanan) and Clintwood (Dickenson) and all surrounding areas should be 90 percent restored by November 2 night.

Rappahannock Electric Cooperative (REC) expects to have most outages restored by the end of the day November 2. Some members may still be without power longer, as access to downed lines is proving difficult in certain off-road and mountainous areas. Remaining outages are concentrated in the counties of Greene, Rappahannock, Fauquier and Madison.

In those areas numerous poles and cross-arms have been broken and need to be replaced in remote locations that are difficult to access even with heavy-duty, four-wheel drive line trucks. Right-of-way crews continue to clear the paths into highly damaged areas.

The crews will also clear trees and limbs from power lines once linemen are able to reach affected areas. In addition to REC work crews and contract resources, the restoration work has been bolstered by help from fourteen sister cooperatives in Tennessee, Alabama, South Carolina and Georgia.

West Virginia

Appalachian Power (AEP), which services Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia, reports that in West Virginia many areas will be 90 percent restored by the night of November 2 while some will not until the night of November 4. The company is dealing with transmission damage, which is typically assessed by helicopter.

However, crews have to assess damage by 4-wheel-drive and ATV vehicles, and foot patrol in the most remote, mountainous regions of our territory until it is safe to fly a helicopter. AEP secured more than 400 outside workers are positioned in areas where outages are expected and will assist more than 500 locally based Appalachian Power employees with service restoration. Additional crews were secured from AEP's sister companies.

October 31, MonPower (FirstEnergy) reports that damage assessment is underway but is being complicated due to weather conditions. Restoration is expected by early next week for the majority of customers, but because of the difficult terrain and snow on the ground, and additional accumulation expected, some customers in remote areas may not be restored until the middle of next week.

Damage assessments will be conducted via helicopter once conditions improve. Across the FirstEnergy utilities, more the 12,000 company personnel, electrical contractors and outside utility resources are assisting with service restoration efforts. The utility is working to secure additional resources.

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